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Posted by on Aug 11, 2011 in Ancestral Health

Faith of a Paleo Scientist

So what are my thoughts on Evolution? They fit in pretty well with a famous Mormon chemist, Henry Eyring. In the middle party of the last century, Eyring prolifically researched all kinds of crazy chemistry. The chemistry building, in which I studied general and organic chemistry was named after him! He also stood up as man who combined his religious and science worlds together during a time when religion and science really did not get along.

Eyring wrote a book called The Faith of a Scientist. One of my favorite Eyring quotes is,“Is there any conflict between science and religion? There is no conflict in the mind of God, but often there is conflict in the minds of men.” I am not too prideful to state that I do not have a great understanding of the Creation. The Bible is not really that clear on what all took place. I think that God could use a variety of interesting tools to create man—including using evolution. Many things are possible and who am I to place limits. 

Eyring further states “such a topic [evolution] becomes controversial partly because it is interesting to us, but it seems to be sufficiently nonessential to our salvation that the Creator has only briefly treated it in the scriptures. If you think about it, it makes almost no difference at all to the way we should live our lives and treat one another.”

This is the key to a Christian lifestyle. Its not about if someone believes in evolution or not, but how we treat our fellow men. 

And here is a pretty amusing story of Eyring’s thoughts on the intelligence of apes.

“One time I was stuck most of a day in London and couldn’t face the thought of sightseeing, so I went to the London Zoo. I was attracted by a crowd watching the great apes. One fellow in particular was getting a lot of attention as he sat close to the front of the cage on a tree platform. As the zoo visitors moved closer, he suddenly spewed them with water he had in his mouth. Now, that was interesting! I found a bench across the path—out of range—and watched. The ape got down and went over to his water trough to reload. He then went about the cage awhile and finally repositioned himself on the platform. He waited—patiently. Finally a new group of humanoids, not aware of the danger, moved into range. Spray! Splat! Bullseye! The fellow practically chortled out loud as he made his trip to the trough. I spent the entire afternoon enjoying his enjoyment. Theoretically, he was there for our amusement, but quite clearly, he didn’t understand that. He thought we were there for his. I have to admit I kind of admired the fellow. Animals seem pretty wonderful to me. I’d be content to discover that I share a common heritage with them, so long as God is at the controls.”

My thoughts exactly! I’d be just plain ok sharing a common ancestor with Curious George.

I know God exists. He loves me. He wants me to be happy. I don’t know how the creation went down. I can hold this uncertainty in my mind alongside my conviction that God lives. And honestly right now, I really think that living a paleo lifestyle has brought me both health and happiness.